One Step At a Time: Helping Young Children Be Active!
   

References

  1. Yard Clean UpBirch LL, Parker L, Burns A, eds. 2012. Early Childhood Obesity Prevention Policies. Washington, DC: National Academies Press.
  2. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, U.S. Department of Agriculture, U.S. Department of Education, U.S. Department of the Interior. Let’s Move: America’s Move to Raise Healthier Generations of Kids—Active Families [website]. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, U.S. Department of Agriculture, U.S. Department of Education, U.S. Department of the Interior.
  3. Administration for Children and Families, Region III. 2006. I Am Moving, I Am Learning: A Proactive Approach for Addressing Childhood Obesity in Head Start Children—Summary Report: The First Two Years. Philadelphia, PA: Administration for Children and Families, Region III.
  4. Patrick K, Spear B, Holt K, Sofka D, eds. 2001. Bright Futures in Practice: Physical Activity. Arlington, VA: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health.

Resource Highlight

Let’s Move
The Let’s Move: America’s Move to Raise Healthier Generations of Kids—Active Families website gives suggestions for activities to help families to have a healthier, active lifestyle. Being physically active as a family can be a fun way to get everyone moving. Children who believe they are competent and have the skills to be physically active are more likely to be active. And those who feel supported by families and friends to become active or who are surrounded by others who enjoy physical activity are more likely to participate.

See Resources for a list of materials for child care providers and for parents.

 

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